This study is a contribution to the reconstruction of the geomorphology and the glacial history of the northernVictoria Land coastal glaciers. High-resolution single-channel reflection seismic lines were collected in 2002within the framework of the Italian Antarctic programme (PNRA), in Wood Bay and Lady Newnes Bay, northto Cape Washington (western Ross Sea, Antarctica). The data provide evidence of overdeepened marine subglacialvalleys, more than 1 km deep and 1–2 km wide, formed along the seaward extension of the Tinker, Aviator,Fitzgerald and Icebreaker glaciers and converging into themajor SW–NE ice streamsystem. The spatial distributionand the geometry of the seismic facies, as well as the direct correlation with the seismic sequences in theNorthern Basin, are interpreted to document 1) the depositional activity of a coastal glacial system seaward ofnorthern Victoria Land (NVL) after 18 Ma (based on the seismic correlation with the base of DSDP 273) and possiblyin the early Pliocene, in coalescence with expanded ice streams coming from the south along the DrygalskiBasin, possibly draining from the WAIS as documented at AND-1B in the McMurdo Sound (Naish et al., 2007,2008, 2009), followed by 2) the development of TAM tidewater glaciers that carved sea valleys near theVictoria Land coast, onto the shelf. The transition from a dynamic thick ice sheet covering the coastal area ofNVL to the NVL valley glaciers advancing and retreating up to about 100 kmfromthe coast in the middle Pliocenewould represent a significant environmental change, possibly from interglacial conditions more temperate thantoday and gradually cooling to a cold and dry coastal regime.

Late Neogene geomorphological and glacial reconstruction of the northern Victoria Land coast, western Ross Sea (Antarctica)

Sauli C
;
Busetti M;De Santis L;
2014

Abstract

This study is a contribution to the reconstruction of the geomorphology and the glacial history of the northernVictoria Land coastal glaciers. High-resolution single-channel reflection seismic lines were collected in 2002within the framework of the Italian Antarctic programme (PNRA), in Wood Bay and Lady Newnes Bay, northto Cape Washington (western Ross Sea, Antarctica). The data provide evidence of overdeepened marine subglacialvalleys, more than 1 km deep and 1–2 km wide, formed along the seaward extension of the Tinker, Aviator,Fitzgerald and Icebreaker glaciers and converging into themajor SW–NE ice streamsystem. The spatial distributionand the geometry of the seismic facies, as well as the direct correlation with the seismic sequences in theNorthern Basin, are interpreted to document 1) the depositional activity of a coastal glacial system seaward ofnorthern Victoria Land (NVL) after 18 Ma (based on the seismic correlation with the base of DSDP 273) and possiblyin the early Pliocene, in coalescence with expanded ice streams coming from the south along the DrygalskiBasin, possibly draining from the WAIS as documented at AND-1B in the McMurdo Sound (Naish et al., 2007,2008, 2009), followed by 2) the development of TAM tidewater glaciers that carved sea valleys near theVictoria Land coast, onto the shelf. The transition from a dynamic thick ice sheet covering the coastal area ofNVL to the NVL valley glaciers advancing and retreating up to about 100 kmfromthe coast in the middle Pliocenewould represent a significant environmental change, possibly from interglacial conditions more temperate thantoday and gradually cooling to a cold and dry coastal regime.
Antarctica; western Ross Sea; Neogene
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14083/1214
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