Marine photoheterotrophic microorganisms are capable of using light to meet theirenergy requirements and organic compounds as both carbon and energy sources. We still have little knowledge of the extent to which stimulation of these microorganisms by light could affect the estimates of organic carbon uptake. We evaluated the light and dark prokaryotic organic carbon uptake (3H-leucine) rates in a grid of stations covering the whole Adriatic Sea during winter and late summer. Light-exposed (photosynthetically active radiation and ultraviolet radiation [UVR]) surface samples were either unaffected, photostimulated or photoinhibited without any clear geographical or seasonal pattern. Light-enhanced leucine uptake occurred only in 23% of assays, suggesting that photoheterotrophy is not a major metabolic strategy and/or it is often counterbalanced by negative effects caused by UVR. Concentrations of bacteriochlorophyll a, zeaxanthin and divinyl chlorophyll a were measured in order to relate 3H-leucine uptake to the distribution of aerobic anoxygenic photo trophs (AAPs), total Cyanobacteria and Prochlorococcus populations, respectively, together with direct estimates of total prokaryotes and Synechococcus abundance. No relationship between light-enhanced leucine uptake and presence of picocyanobacteria or AAPs was evident. Divinyl chlorophyll a concentration was below the limit of detection in February, whereas in late summer the highest values were found around 50 m depth in the central and southern basins. In contrast, bacteriochlorophylla concentration was correlated to total prokaryote abundance and dissolved organic carbon. Since locally leucine uptake in the light was markedly different from dark controls, in situ light incubations should be more appropriate than dark incubations when carbon budget calculations are intended.

Effect of sunlight on prokaryotic organic carbon uptake and dynamics of pigments relevant to photoheterotrophy in the Adriatic Sea

CELUSSI M;GIANI M;DEL NEGRO P
2015

Abstract

Marine photoheterotrophic microorganisms are capable of using light to meet theirenergy requirements and organic compounds as both carbon and energy sources. We still have little knowledge of the extent to which stimulation of these microorganisms by light could affect the estimates of organic carbon uptake. We evaluated the light and dark prokaryotic organic carbon uptake (3H-leucine) rates in a grid of stations covering the whole Adriatic Sea during winter and late summer. Light-exposed (photosynthetically active radiation and ultraviolet radiation [UVR]) surface samples were either unaffected, photostimulated or photoinhibited without any clear geographical or seasonal pattern. Light-enhanced leucine uptake occurred only in 23% of assays, suggesting that photoheterotrophy is not a major metabolic strategy and/or it is often counterbalanced by negative effects caused by UVR. Concentrations of bacteriochlorophyll a, zeaxanthin and divinyl chlorophyll a were measured in order to relate 3H-leucine uptake to the distribution of aerobic anoxygenic photo trophs (AAPs), total Cyanobacteria and Prochlorococcus populations, respectively, together with direct estimates of total prokaryotes and Synechococcus abundance. No relationship between light-enhanced leucine uptake and presence of picocyanobacteria or AAPs was evident. Divinyl chlorophyll a concentration was below the limit of detection in February, whereas in late summer the highest values were found around 50 m depth in the central and southern basins. In contrast, bacteriochlorophylla concentration was correlated to total prokaryote abundance and dissolved organic carbon. Since locally leucine uptake in the light was markedly different from dark controls, in situ light incubations should be more appropriate than dark incubations when carbon budget calculations are intended.
Prokaryotic production ; Bacteriochlorophyll a; Divinyl chlorophyll a
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14083/1141
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