The occurrence of alternating dry/wet conditions in transitional environments, such as wetlands, deltas, and lagoons, usually challenges the use of traditional direct and geophysical surveys for comprehensive hydrogeologic investigations. Moreover, significant mixing between continental fresh groundwater and marine salty surface waters generally takes place in these flat coastal areas. Airborne electromagnetics (AEM) is a promising tool in this respect, as it provides, in a fast and cost effective manner, large-scale distribution of bulk electrical conductivities that can be used profitably to develop hydrogeologic models. The results of a SkyTEM AEM survey in the Venice Lagoon, Italy, show the capability of this technique to significantly improve the knowledge of the hydrogeologic setting of the lagoon and nearby coastland subsurface, irrespective of the different features characterizing the area. The environment consists of salt marshes, mud flats, shallows, tidal channels, islands, together with reclaimed farmlands crossed by natural watercourses and drainage channel networks. In particular, the AEM shows (i) the presence of fresh water (with resistivity larger than 20 X m) underneath the central part of the lagoon at depths from 10 to 25 m below m.s.l., (ii) the interface between different relevant stratigraphic units, e.g., the clayey layer bounding the Holocene–Pleistocene sedimentation, and (iii) the occurrence of areas with possible submarine fresh groundwater discharge. Moreover, the source and inland extent of the saltwater contamination in the shallow coastal aquifers along the southern margin of the lagoon are clearly revealed. AEM data were complemented with very high resolution seismic (VHRS) acquisitions. The integrated analysis of the two data sets allows distinguishing between lithostratigraphic heterogeneity and variability of the subsurface fluids.

Understanding the hydrogeology of the Venice Lagoon subsurface with airborne electromagnetics

Baradello L;Zecchin M;
2011

Abstract

The occurrence of alternating dry/wet conditions in transitional environments, such as wetlands, deltas, and lagoons, usually challenges the use of traditional direct and geophysical surveys for comprehensive hydrogeologic investigations. Moreover, significant mixing between continental fresh groundwater and marine salty surface waters generally takes place in these flat coastal areas. Airborne electromagnetics (AEM) is a promising tool in this respect, as it provides, in a fast and cost effective manner, large-scale distribution of bulk electrical conductivities that can be used profitably to develop hydrogeologic models. The results of a SkyTEM AEM survey in the Venice Lagoon, Italy, show the capability of this technique to significantly improve the knowledge of the hydrogeologic setting of the lagoon and nearby coastland subsurface, irrespective of the different features characterizing the area. The environment consists of salt marshes, mud flats, shallows, tidal channels, islands, together with reclaimed farmlands crossed by natural watercourses and drainage channel networks. In particular, the AEM shows (i) the presence of fresh water (with resistivity larger than 20 X m) underneath the central part of the lagoon at depths from 10 to 25 m below m.s.l., (ii) the interface between different relevant stratigraphic units, e.g., the clayey layer bounding the Holocene–Pleistocene sedimentation, and (iii) the occurrence of areas with possible submarine fresh groundwater discharge. Moreover, the source and inland extent of the saltwater contamination in the shallow coastal aquifers along the southern margin of the lagoon are clearly revealed. AEM data were complemented with very high resolution seismic (VHRS) acquisitions. The integrated analysis of the two data sets allows distinguishing between lithostratigraphic heterogeneity and variability of the subsurface fluids.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.14083/2688
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